Lyn Warmath

 

avatar for Lyn Warmath


 

 

8:30 AM
– 5:00 PM

PLL-SIS Summit: Change as Action (registration required)

The culmination of a two-year effort by the private law library community to explore ways to embrace change, demonstrate value, and learn about leading-edge trends, this one-day program has speakers and thinkers on a variety of engaging topics.  Esther Dyson will deliver the keynote address; Jim Jones of Hildebrandt and David Curle of Outsell, Inc. are among other speakers. There will be break-out programs that dissect law firm management and presentations by high-level consultants, ground-breaking practicing librarians, and law firm C-level administrators.

Participants will take away the practical skills and essential information to be a change agent in their law firms.

Separate registration fee: $145.00 - be sure to register well in advance of the June 17 deadline!

3:00 PM
– 4:00 PM

Nominations Committee Orientation/Meeting (by invitation)

Nominations Committee Orientation/Meeting (by invitation)

3:30 PM
– 5:00 PM

Price Index for Legal Publications Committee
Price Index for Legal Publications Committee
 

 

7:00 AM
– 8:45 AM

ALL-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting (sponsored by LexisNexis)
ALL-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting (sponsored by LexisNexis)

10:15 AM
– 11:45 AM

Opening General Session/Keynote Speaker

The Supreme Court and Free Speech 

How the Supreme Court is fracturing over speech issues, and how the press and the public are both causing it, and suffering for it

Dahlia Lithwick is a senior editor at Slate, and in that capacity, writes the "Supreme Court Dispatches" and "Jurisprudence" columns. She is a biweekly columnist for Newsweek. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Harper's, The Washington Post, and Commentary, among other places. She received the Online News Association's award for online commentary in 2001 and again in 2005, for a series she coauthored on torture, and was the first online journalist invited to serve on the Steering Committee for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. She is the co-author of "Me v. Everybody: Absurd Contracts for an Absurd World," a legal humor book, and "I Will Sing Life: Voices from the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp", a book about seven children from Paul Newman's camp with life-threatening illnesses. She lives in Charlottesville, VA with her husband and two sons.

This session will be webcast live here.

12:00 PM
– 1:15 PM

PLL-SIS Business Meeting and Luncheon (sponsored by BNA)

Separate registration fee: $10.00 - be sure to register well in advance of the June 17 deadline!

1:30 PM
– 2:45 PM

A6: Best Practices for Evaluating a New Electronic Resource

Target Audience: Electronic services librarians, acquisitions librarians, solo librarians, library directors

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to identify and list the best practices to employ when considering the acquisition of a new electronic resource.
2. Participants will be able to design and conduct an electronic resource trial using a focus group comprised of stakeholders within their institution.

This program will highlight the best practices to use when evaluating a new electronic resource for acquisition. These best practices are gleaned from the library literature, published surveys, and the experiences of the presenters. Best practices include: "try before you buy," obtaining stakeholder involvement, benchmarking, and using an electronic resource evaluation checklist, among others. The program will focus on four areas: 1) the electronic resource evaluation checklist, 2) selection and coordination of a trial focus group, 3) the cost-benefit analysis, and 4) subscription versus ownership and other licensing options. Other considerations to be examined include: authentication, user interface, content appropriateness, search capability, browsing capability, currency and archives, vendor support, training, user statistics, bill back mechanisms, online documentation, and formatting. In addition, the program will present questions to be asked of other stakeholders in the acquisitions process (e.g., the IT department, catalogers, public services). Program materials will include a sample electronic resource evaluation checklist and bibliography.

3:00 PM
– 4:00 PM

B2: Copyright Conversation with Marybeth and Lolly

Target Audience: Librarians interested in U.S. copyright law and the complex issues resulting from the technological changes of the past three decades

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will assess changes to copyright law over the past 35 years.
2. Participants will evaluate the need for additional changes to U.S. copyright laws related to digital technologies.

Join a substantive discussion about U.S. copyright law with two preeminent experts. Marybeth Peters, current Register of Copyrights with the U.S. Copyright Office, has announced plans to step down from this post at the end of 2010-a position she has held since 1994. AALL’s own copyright expert, Laura (Lolly) Gasaway, has written and spoken extensively about copyright issues impacting libraries. Gasaway co-chaired the Section 108 Study Group, which examined the exceptions and limitations applicable to libraries and archives under the Copyright Act and made recommendations. Copyright Committee Chair Roger Skalbeck will moderate a discussion of copyright reform in the United States with a particular focus on library issues. Drawing on decades of experience, Gasaway and Peters will provide insights into major developments in copyright, including the 1976 Copyright Act, Fair Use, the TEACH Act, the DMCA, Section 108, distance education, and database protection. In examining touch points for copyright events relevant to libraries, these experts will talk about pending or possible copyright reform, including relevant legislative activities and court developments.

4:15 PM
– 5:15 PM

C2: Hot Topic: WikiLeaks, Intelligence, and the Law of Secrecy

Target audience: Librarians who seek access to information held by the federal government

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will identify federal statutes, executive orders, and Department of Defense regulations and directives that apply to the classification of information and the disclosure of classified information, as well as the various levels of security clearances possessed by federal employees.

2) Participants will identify historical situations where the unauthorized disclosure of classified information has jeopardized intelligence operations and describe scenarios in which secrecy is an essential factor in protecting national security.

Secrecy often poses difficulties in democracies where transparency of government operations is the norm. Claims to secrecy are viewed with suspicion, and questions arise as to whether the cloak of secrecy hides not secrets essential for national security, but evidence of malfeasance and incompetence.  With the detention of Army Private Bradley Manning for the suspected release of classified information to WikiLeaks, many have viewed his role as one of whistleblower, rather than lawbreaker or spy. 

Learn how information is classified, who has the authority to classify and declassify it, and who has access to it. Focusing on intelligence operations, also learn the importance of secrecy in protecting the national security of the United States, and the damage resulting from breaches of secrecy.

The views and opinions expressed during this program are those of the speakers and do not represent the views or policies of the United States Government.

 

 

7:45 AM
– 8:45 AM

Publishing Initiatives Caucus Meeting
Publishing Initiatives Caucus Meeting

5:30 PM
– 6:30 PM

Law Library Journal and AALL Spectrum Authors Reception (by invitation) (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)
Law Library Journal and AALL Spectrum Authors Reception (by invitation) (sponsored by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)
 

 

1:00 PM
– 1:30 PM

J4: Embracing Creative Conflict: A Formula for Better Decision Making
Target Audience: Anyone who participates in workplace decision making

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will discover the positive role that conflict can play in decision making.
2. Participants will be able to outline and assess the elements of a successful process to harness conflict in group decision making, as well as the abilities that the leader and participants must bring to that process.

The most innovative organizations have moved beyond merely managing conflict. They have learned to actually encourage healthy conflict and harness the creative energy it sparks. Using this "creative contention," organizations hammer out superior solutions to the problems they confront. The decision-making participants forge closer bonds with one another. These groups also implement decisions or new programs more easily because most participants become committed change agents during the decision-making process. In the years since the University of Georgia Law Library transitioned to a team-based structure, its primary decision-making body, the Steering Group, has grown into this model of decision making. Listen and learn as two long-time participants share important milestones in that growth and explain the processes and skills that are necessary to make creative contention a viable tool.
 

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