Eugene Hsue

 

avatar for Eugene Hsue


 

 

7:30 AM
– 8:30 AM

FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Law Interest Group Meeting
FCIL-SIS Teaching Foreign and International Law Interest Group Meeting

8:45 AM
– 9:45 AM

D1: RDA for Everyone: Resource Description and Access Explained to Non-Catalogers

Target Audience: Directors, public services librarians, IT professionals, and non-catalogers in technical services in all types of libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to understand RDA's new approach to relationships between authors and works, how this new approach needs to be accommodated, and how it can be utilized by public services librarians.
2. Participants will be able to assess RDA's new approach to dealing with publishing patterns and resolving challenges posed by diversification of electronic and online media, and how this approach can be utilized by acquisitions and serial librarians.

Resource Description and Access (RDA), the new cataloging code published in June 2010, is based on a recently formalized philosophy for providing access to materials. It is written with the international world of computers and online access strongly in mind along with the relationships of information elements. Librarians, other than catalogers, may not know much about this new code, nor may they know how these new standards for metadata creation will affect public services and technical services areas other than cataloging. Most may also not be aware of its possible applications outside of integrated library systems. "RDA for Everyone" will bring together a respected law cataloger/RDA tester, a well-known associate director/professor of legal research, and a reference and technology librarian (who is also the Chair of the Education Committee of the CS-SIS), to relate a brief history and description of RDA, explaining how it affects discovery and use of information, and how it has potential use outside the traditional library catalog.

  • Speaker

    Coordinator: Ajaye Bloomstone, Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center Library; Moderator: Aaron Wolfe Kuperman, Library of Congress, Law Cataloging Section; Speakers: Richard Amelung, Saint Louis University, Omer Poos Law Library; Amalia Contursi, Columbia University, The Arthur W. Diamond Law Library; Caroline Young, Rutgers University Law School Library

  • Time Monday July 25, 2011 8:45am - 9:45am
  • Venue PCC-Room 201(C)
  • Type Programs, AALL Programs
  • SIS-Sponsored Programs TS-SIS
  • Level Introductory
  • Program Track General or Core Programs

10:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

E2: Don't Just Blog It, Publish It!
Target Audience: Librarians interested in blogging and publishing

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will gain skills to craft postings that could be used to present the librarian community in a professional manner through other publishing mediums.
2. Participants will learn how to use law library/blogger community views and input to better hone their writing style and tone.

Greg Lambert, a prolific blogger and tweeter in the library community, routinely imparts his views and knowledge on a variety of cutting-edge topics that help keep the busy librarian informed. A frequent contributor to 3 Geeks and a Law blog, Mark Gediman is known for his thoughtful commentary sure to provoke discussion on posted topics. Their presentation will use the example of an August 2009 cost recovery blog post being turned into a March 2010 AALL Spectrum article by Gediman. The presenters will explain their experiences of turning what started as a simple posting into an article for publication and beyond.

10:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

E3: The Newest Codes in the Library: The Smartphone Tag Project

Target Audience: Law library managers and public services librarians interested in disseminating information about the library and library services to technology-savvy patrons

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to describe what smartphone tags are, what types of information they encode, and how they can be used to extend library services.
2. Participants will be able to analyze the pros and cons of implementing a smartphone tag reader project in their own libraries.

In the fall of 2010, the University of Colorado's William A. Wise Law Library implemented a project to post smartphone readable tags in strategic places throughout the library using Microsoft Tag Reader software. These tags lead users to web pages, pdf files, PowerPoint presentations, text messages, and contact information relevant to the tag's location. The law library used these tags to extend library services by providing instruction on how to use collections and equipment; awareness of electronic resources and current acquisitions in specific subject collections; and marketing of library services. During this practical program, project manager Robert Linz will explain all aspects of this inexpensive patron outreach project, including planning; implementation; advertising; and analyzing the successes, surprises, and lessons learned.

10:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

E6: Teaching Advocacy in International Commercial Arbitration Research Is Essential

Target Audience: Academic law librarians and law firm librarians who support international commercial arbitration practice groups

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will identify the characteristics of international commercial arbitration that create challenges to effective research and advocacy, and will master strategies and identify resources necessary to overcome these challenges.
2. Participants will learn how to effectively demonstrate the essential print and multimedia resources necessary for international commercial arbitration research and advocacy.

In the past, most international commercial arbitrators and practitioners came from a few international law firms. With the explosion of international commerce, international commercial arbitration (ICA) has become much more prevalent, and more generalists have become involved. In a field that is qualitatively different than other areas of law, more research and practice instruction is necessary. Law librarians have unique qualifications to assist in this instruction. The program will explore the reasons favoring and disfavoring ICA as a dispute resolution tool. The program will also discuss how the characteristics of ICA create challenges to effective research and advocacy. The program will discuss eight sources of law in international commercial arbitration, how to locate these sources, and the use of these sources in ICA advocacy.

10:45 AM
– 11:45 AM

F1: Authority Control Vocabularies and the Semantic Web

Target Audience: Librarians who work with metadata, metadata frameworks, and controlled vocabularies

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to assess various sources for authority control of elements and vocabularies in the world beyond the MARC format and OCLC authority files.
2. Participants will be able to judge which vocabularies fit their library's needs for metadata organization.

Barbara Tillett and John Mark Ockerbloom will explore the real potential behind linked library data by providing an informative overview of acronyms like RDF, LCSH/SKOS , VIAF and the RDA Registry and by highlighting how the linked data from id.loc.gov is being used to power searches in the Online Books Page and the main library catalog, Franklin, at the University of Pennsylvania.

10:45 AM
– 11:45 AM

F4: The Librarian as Author: AALL/LexisNexis Call for Papers

Come meet the award-winning authors of the 2011 AALL/LexisNexis Call for Papers competition. Hear the authors discuss how they chose their topics, researched and wrote their articles, got past writer's block, juggled the challenges of writing while working 8-5, and other topics. If you want to hear the words of successful writers, you won't want to miss it.

  • Speaker

    Coordinator: David A. Hollander, Princeton University, Firestone Library; Speakers: David Armond, Brigham Young University, Howard W. Hunter Law Library; Margaret (Meg) Butler, Georgia State University College of Law Library; William M. Cross, University of North Carolina, School of Information and Library Science; Shawn G. Nevers, Brigham Young University, Howard W. Hunter Law Library; Mary Whisner, University of Washington, Gallagher Law Library

  • Time Monday July 25, 2011 10:45am - 11:45am
  • Venue PCC-Room 204(A)
  • Type Programs, AALL Programs

10:45 AM
– 11:45 AM

FCIL-SIS Program: Indigenous Peoples Law Interest Group Presents "Locating the Law of Indigenous Peoples"

Jolande Goldberg, of the Library of Congress, Policy & Standards Division, Acquisitions & Bibliographic Access Directorate, will introduce the latest Law Classification schedule, KIA-KIK, covering indigenous peoples of the western hemisphere. Dr. Goldberg will also present the new LOC portal, which is a remarkable development, both technically and in its ability to make indigenous peoples visible within the law classification. Additionally, the LOC portal can provide easier, direct access to the documents of indigenous peoples’ history and current conditions.

12:15 PM
– 2:00 PM

2:15 PM
– 3:30 PM

ALL-SIS Program: Empiricist or Empirical Reference Librarian?: Structuring an Empirical Legal Research Program

Fordham Law Library hired a reference librarian/empirical research specialist and other academic law libraries are including knowledge of empirical research methods into their reference librarian job descriptions. At the Harvard Law School Library, there are two empirical research positions: empirical research fellow and empirical research consultant. Duke University School of Law has an empirical research associate position, as well as a reference librarian who coordinates the library’s Empirical Legal Research Program. These are a few examples of how law libraries are responding to faculty’s increasing demand for empirical legal research support. While other sessions have focused on resources for doing empirical work, this program focuses on how academic law libraries are meeting the needs of faculty members by creating empirical positions within or in conjunction with the library. It will address the factors that led these institutions to create the empirical legal research programs and the structures of these programs. Panelists will discuss how the programs were implemented, and will evaluate the programs’ strengths and weaknesses.

2:15 PM
– 3:30 PM

G5: The Responsibility to Protect: An Emerging Norm in International Humanitarian Law?

Target Audience: Librarians who support students, faculty, and attorneys working in the areas of international law or humanitarian law specifically

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will list the key features of the doctrine of Responsibility to Protect.
2. Participants will create a research plan in International Humanitarian Law.

The purpose of the Responsibility to Protect doctrine is to prevent mass atrocities by placing a duty upon state actors to protect their citizens. When individual states fail in this duty, it is the collective responsibility of the international community to respond. This response may include, in an exceptional case, military intervention. Gareth Evans, a former Foreign Minister of Australia, and the former President of the International Crisis Group, has promoted this development in International Humanitarian Law. The Responsibility to Protect is an emerging norm with an uncertain future. Its status has been a subject of debate in the United Nations General Assembly. This program will discuss its development, its application or misapplication, and its future as a mechanism to prevent mass atrocities. The program will also provide a strategy for researching a cutting-edge topic in International Humanitarian Law.

2:30 PM
– 3:30 PM

RIPS-SIS Program: C8 I'm a New ___ Now What?

Do you aspire to become an academic, firm, or court library director? Do you think you’re ready for middle management or to serve as a committee chair? Are you new to one of these roles and in need of advice? Join seasoned veterans and newbies to the job you have or desire in a town hall discussion about the challenges and rewards of these positions. Coffee will be provided.

6:30 PM
– 7:30 PM

International Attendees Joint Reception (AALL/FCIL/IALL) (sponsored by BNA, LexisNexis, William S. Hein & Co., Inc. and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)

International Attendees Joint Reception (AALL/FCIL/IALL) (sponsored by BNA, LexisNexis, William S. Hein & Co., and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)

 

 

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

H1: Getting to Yes for Your Library: Negotiating Vendor Contracts in Your Favor

Target Audience: All librarians who have a role in vendor contract negotiations

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to analyze contract terms to better understand how those terms affect the end results of their negotiations.
2. Participants will acquire the tools to negotiate a favorable contract with a services vendor.

Vendor contracts are getting more complex, with finer print. Many librarians are involved in the contract negotiation process and need to be able to read and comprehend often complex contracts in order to get the most favorable terms for their libraries and institutions. Two attorneys who are involved in their large firms' vendor contract negotiations, along with their library directors, will discuss contract best practices, what elements to look for in a contract, and which clauses or provisions will render a contract unworkable. They will offer practical tips on negotiation skills, and on reaching a workable agreement with service vendors.

9:00 AM
– 10:30 AM

H4: The Role of Law Libraries in Advancing Law.gov: Open-sourcing America's Operating System

Target Audience: Library professionals who manage collections of legal materials and legal research budgets

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will gain a greater understanding of the legal, technological, and policy implications of a national repository of public law and the specific steps law libraries can take to advance public law.
2. Participants will learn how Law.gov will foster innovation, competition, and choice in legal research-and how this impacts library collection costs.

American law is in the public domain, but it remains expensive or downright inaccessible to most of the people it governs. Law.Gov is a nationwide movement to make the primary legal materials of the United States readily available to all, and to assist governmental institutions in making these materials available in bulk as distributed, authenticated, well-formatted data. Panelists will discuss the 2010 Law.gov report and findings of the National Inventory of Primary Legal Research in connection with AALL's policy position on open access to legal materials, with a special emphasis on the role of law librarians to make Law.gov a reality. Panelists will also discuss what Law.gov means for law libraries and their budgets, law schools, and legal publishers.

10:45 AM
– 11:30 AM

I6: Challenges Posed by Transnational Litigation: Latin America and the Civil Law Tradition

Target Audience: Law librarians who support faculty, students, and government and private attorneys who work with civil law jurisdictions and U.S. litigation involving the doctrine of forum non conveniens

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to describe the essential principles of the civil law tradition necessary to understand the impact of U.S. transnational litigation in Latin America.
2. Participants will be able to explain forum shopping and the repercussions of the U.S. doctrine of forum non conveniens.

Globalization has brought different legal systems closer together. Legal practitioners, government lawyers, and judges increasingly need to deal with cases that require research and understanding of a foreign legal system or specific aspects of comparative law. People doing business in civil law countries need to understand the fundamentals of civil code-based jurisdictions. This presentation will introduce the main elements that distinguish common law and civil law traditions, especially with respect to Latin American jurisdictions. Additionally, the U.S. bar has been very active on issues of forum shopping involving civil law jurisdictions. For example, there are cases involving U.S. multinational corporations litigating in Latin American and U.S. courts for damages arising from activities related to petroleum exploration and banana plantations, or based on U.S.-manufactured defective products. The presentation will also discuss various responses (judicial decisions and legislation) from Latin American civil law countries to the U.S. forum non conveniens doctrine, and provide participants with a research guide for exploring these issues further.

11:45 AM
– 12:45 PM

FCIL-SIS Education Committee Meeting
FCIL-SIS Education Committee Meeting

1:00 PM
– 1:30 PM

J2: Authors' Rights: Give Your Publication Nine Lives

Target Audience: Anyone who publishes or plans to publish articles

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to identify their rights as authors under current copyright law and determine which rights they want to retain.
2. Participants will be able to implement techniques to retain certain rights.

Now that institutional repositories, digital libraries, and scholarly communities such as SSRN are commonplace, it's difficult to anticipate future uses of a published work. Before submitting an article for review or upon acceptance of an article, it is important to read and comprehend the fine print in the publisher's author agreement. Author agreements may strip authors of basic rights afforded under copyright law. This session will educate participants about basic author rights and engage authors in the process of identifying rights that are a personal priority. In addition, participants will learn how to revise author agreements, select an appropriate alternate model agreement, and negotiate with publishers to maintain priority rights.

3:15 PM
– 4:15 PM

K4: Enhancing Library Services with Technical Services Skills: From the Backroom to the Front Lines

Target Audience: Technical services librarians, public services librarians, library managers

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will become acquainted with ways to utilize staff in more creative ways.
2. Participants will be introduced to new initiatives that can benefit their libraries and generate increased appreciation for technical services staff skills.

Shrinking library budgets often require reductions in materials and staffing, even as demands for library services continue to grow. Some libraries deal with this dilemma by bridging the previously well-defined distinctions between technical services and public services. Initiatives and projects on public services department "wish lists" can often be readily accomplished when goals are realigned to utilize the expertise and specialized skill sets of technical services staff. This program will explore techniques for building cooperative partnerships between the two departments. Managerial tips, best practices, ways of fostering innovation and creativity, and initiatives at various law libraries will be discussed.

 

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