Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event + mobile app → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Friday, July 22
 

12:30pm

W1F: Producing Library Videos: A Hands-On Experience

Target Audience: Librarians interested in producing instructional and marketing videos

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn how to produce short, quality videos, by writing, shooting, and editing a simple story.
2. Participants will be able to identify appropriate video production equipment options for various budgets and skill levels.

Communicating through video is an increasingly popular medium for education and training. Instructional videos provide patrons the flexibility to learn about library resources at their convenience. Producing videos can save library staff time by documenting research tasks and library tours in a medium that can be repeated over and over again for individuals. A trend among law librarians is increased discussion of adopting do-it-yourself approaches to creating videos for their institutions. This is because the cost of hiring professional filmmakers to create dynamic videos is usually prohibitively expensive given typical library budgets. The goal of this workshop is to provide practical, hands-on experience to enable law librarians to write, shoot, and edit informative videos for the benefit of their patrons and clients. A professional filmmaker will provide instruction and guidance as participants test their new skills throughout the workshop. The librarian speakers will share their experiences as novice filmmakers with no production budget. While some familiarity and comfort with digital cameras and creative software programs will be helpful prior to the workshop, participants will receive an introduction to all video production tools along the way.

Separate registration fees

AALL Members: $295.00
Nonmembers: $445.00

Registration includes: program, equipment for use during program, and a boxed lunch on Saturday.

Attendance is limited for all workshops - be sure to register well in advance of the June 17 deadline!

Friday July 22, 2011 12:30pm - 5:00pm
OFFSITE-Temple University
 
Saturday, July 23
 

9:00am

W1S: Producing Library Videos: A Hands-On Experience

Target Audience: Librarians interested in producing instructional and marketing videos

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn how to produce short, quality videos, by writing, shooting, and editing a simple story.
2. Participants will be able to identify appropriate video production equipment options for various budgets and skill levels.

Communicating through video is an increasingly popular medium for education and training. Instructional videos provide patrons the flexibility to learn about library resources at their convenience. Producing videos can save library staff time by documenting research tasks and library tours in a medium that can be repeated over and over again for individuals. A trend among law librarians is increased discussion of adopting do-it-yourself approaches to creating videos for their institutions. This is because the cost of hiring professional filmmakers to create dynamic videos is usually prohibitively expensive given typical library budgets. The goal of this workshop is to provide practical, hands-on experience to enable law librarians to write, shoot, and edit informative videos for the benefit of their patrons and clients. A professional filmmaker will provide instruction and guidance as participants test their new skills throughout the workshop. The librarian speakers will share their experiences as novice filmmakers with no production budget. While some familiarity and comfort with digital cameras and creative software programs will be helpful prior to the workshop, participants will receive an introduction to all video production tools along the way.

Separate registration fees

AALL Members: $295.00
Nonmembers: $445.00

Registration includes: program, equipment for use during program, and a boxed lunch on Saturday.

Attendance is limited for all workshops - be sure to register well in advance of the June 17 deadline!

Saturday July 23, 2011 9:00am - 5:00pm
OFFSITE-Temple University
 
Sunday, July 24
 

4:15pm

C6: Legal Education for Law Practice: Teaching Legal Research in a Practice Environment

Target Audience: All librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn the rationale and learning theory for embedding librarians in support of clinical teaching in law schools.
2. Participants will be able to analyze the tools and techniques needed for starting an embedded librarian project at their law schools.

This program describes the Mason Law Library's experience of embedding librarians in clinics at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, rated second highest in the nation for clinical teaching. The project's rationale is based on adult learning theory, teaching at the point of need, and recommendations from Educating Lawyers: Preparation for the Profession of Law (2008) for teaching legal research as a part of lawyers' "expert performance." Embedding librarians in a practice environment enables users to learn and integrate advanced legal research skills, professional judgment, and ethics through modeling, practice, coaching, and feedback. The panelists include the embedded librarians and clinic directors, who will discuss the effectiveness of this experiment.

Sunday July 24, 2011 4:15pm - 5:15pm
PCC-Room 108(AB)
 
Monday, July 25
 

10:00am

E6: Teaching Advocacy in International Commercial Arbitration Research Is Essential

Target Audience: Academic law librarians and law firm librarians who support international commercial arbitration practice groups

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will identify the characteristics of international commercial arbitration that create challenges to effective research and advocacy, and will master strategies and identify resources necessary to overcome these challenges.
2. Participants will learn how to effectively demonstrate the essential print and multimedia resources necessary for international commercial arbitration research and advocacy.

In the past, most international commercial arbitrators and practitioners came from a few international law firms. With the explosion of international commerce, international commercial arbitration (ICA) has become much more prevalent, and more generalists have become involved. In a field that is qualitatively different than other areas of law, more research and practice instruction is necessary. Law librarians have unique qualifications to assist in this instruction. The program will explore the reasons favoring and disfavoring ICA as a dispute resolution tool. The program will also discuss how the characteristics of ICA create challenges to effective research and advocacy. The program will discuss eight sources of law in international commercial arbitration, how to locate these sources, and the use of these sources in ICA advocacy.

Monday July 25, 2011 10:00am - 10:30am
PCC-Room 204(C)
 
Tuesday, July 26
 

9:00am

H6: Making the Grade: Assessing Legal Research Skills in the Classroom and Firm

Target Audience: Academic law librarians, firm librarians, and public law librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn the theory, terminology, and importance of assessment.
2. Participants will become familiar with current examples of assessment in law schools and law firms.

The topic of assessment in legal education continues to gather steam and is now at the forefront with the implications of Proposed ABA Standards on Student Learning Outcomes and talk of a legal research component on the bar exam. Additionally, as law firms implement new associate training models, law librarians must be able to assess the learning that occurs, as well as evaluate the training program itself. This program will feature law librarians actively involved in assessment in law schools and in law firms. David Armond, Senior Law Librarian at the BYU Law Library, will address the use of pre-teaching feedback, such as using the results of TWEN quizzes before lectures to shape in-class instruction, and using practicums as effective assessment tools in a first-year legal research course. Molly Brownfield, until recently Head of Reference Services at Duke Law Library, will address assessment in the context of a specialized upper-level research course, including concrete examples of research assignments and corresponding grading sheets. Linda-Jean Schneider, Director of Libraries & Research at Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, will discuss assessment activities she has undertaken in connection with her firm’s associate training program, including the assessment of associates’ legal research skills and the evaluation of the training program itself. Don MacLeod, Manager of Knowledge Management at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, heads his firm’s mandatory three-hour research orientation for first-year and summer associates, and will discuss assessing attorneys’ legal research skills in connection with that orientation. He will also discuss his use of Research Monitor to evaluate the use of electronic subscriptions within his firm.

Tuesday July 26, 2011 9:00am - 10:30am
PCC-Room 204(C)

3:15pm

K2: What You Need to Know about Using DVD Clips in the Classroom: Now You Can

Target Audience: Public and instructional services librarians; audiovisual and computer services librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to explain current guidelines for using DVD clips for teaching purposes.
2. Participants will be able to evaluate options for the legal circumvention of copyright protection systems on DVDs.

Faculty and presenters routinely use film content in instructional sessions and academic meetings. Previous rules prohibiting the "ripping" of DVD content hampered the ability to create smooth showings of multiple clips from a variety of DVDs. On July 26, 2010, the Librarian of Congress announced six classes of works exempt for three years from the statutory prohibition (i.e., 17 USC 1201(a)(1)) regarding circumvention of copyright protection systems. One of these classes is "motion pictures on DVDs" when "short portions" are used for educational use by college professors and film/media studies students. This program will review how to apply the new guideline, including procedures for circumventing DVD copyright protection systems. It will also examine socio-political and technological contexts for the DVD guideline change and their relevance for future media formats.

Tuesday July 26, 2011 3:15pm - 4:15pm
PCC-Room 204(B)
 

Schedule Sponsor